treeporn:

Photographer: mistahlewis

treeporn:

Photographer: mistahlewis

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 586 notes. .

nybg:

artandsciencejournal:

Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen

When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.

The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.

To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.

-Anna Paluch

There’s a business opportunity here for the morbid florists out there. How visceral can you make baby’s breath, though? —MN

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 1,157 notes.

(Source: thingsorganizedneatly, via rubiksboob)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 1,813 notes. .
colognecouture:

become a part of the movement » Cologne Couture «

colognecouture:

become a part of the movement » Cologne Couture «



(via landscapearchitecture)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 801 notes. .
bebinn:

bubsbox:

bebinn:

Please reblog and donate.
Marissa Alexander’s now faces a 60-year sentence for firing a warning shot into the wall to stop her abusive husband’s attack. Her legal team is working pro bono, but she still owes over $250,000 in legal expenses. The prosecutor, Angela Corey, is the same who couldn’t get a conviction for the murder of Trayvon Martin.
Self-defense against domestic violence does not deserve life in prison.

you realize that 1021 days is only 2.8 years right?still fucked up, but it’s not 60 years.

One thousand and twenty-one days is the amount of time she’s already spent in prison (hence the #howmuchlonger hashtag). She is now under house arrest and awaiting retrial, which could triple her original sentence.

bebinn:

bubsbox:

bebinn:

Please reblog and donate.

Marissa Alexander’s now faces a 60-year sentence for firing a warning shot into the wall to stop her abusive husband’s attack. Her legal team is working pro bono, but she still owes over $250,000 in legal expenses. The prosecutor, Angela Corey, is the same who couldn’t get a conviction for the murder of Trayvon Martin.

Self-defense against domestic violence does not deserve life in prison.

you realize that 1021 days is only 2.8 years right?
still fucked up, but it’s not 60 years.

One thousand and twenty-one days is the amount of time she’s already spent in prison (hence the #howmuchlonger hashtag). She is now under house arrest and awaiting retrial, which could triple her original sentence.

(via becauseiamawoman)

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 14,242 notes. .

wellthatsadorable:

thefrogman:

Children Read To Shelter Cats To Soothe Them

Animal Rescue League of Berks County [website | facebook]

[h/t: dakotaangel]

Oh cool, the most wonderful thing in the world to close out my week. A+ work, internet!

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 173,601 notes.
lepetitcorner:

Highlander by K.C. Keefer

lepetitcorner:

Highlander by K.C. Keefer

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 3 notes. .
Mashed Parsnips and Potatoes with Chives and Parsley

foodnex:

Ah, parsnips. Do you like them? If you’ve never had a parsnip, you don’t know what you’re missing! They look like white carrots and are closely related to them. Sweet, like carrots, but with a nutty, buttery taste. Lovely in soups and stews, delicious roasted, parsnips also…

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 4 notes.
superfoodsfan:

(Via: fuckyeahveganlife.tumblr.com) Photo

superfoodsfan:

(Via: fuckyeahveganlife.tumblr.com) Photo

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 38 notes. .

ryanpanos:

Lalibela Rock-Cut Churches | Socks Studio

エチオピアの山岳地帯にもこんな遺跡が眠っている。

13世紀のキリスト教建築?

Lalibela is a mountainous area in Ethiopia famous for its a peculiar complex of twelve religious constructions built probably in the 12th or 13th century. These “Monolithic Churches” (Church of the Redeemer, of Saint Mary, of Mount Sinai, of Golgotha, of the House of the Cross, of the House of the Virgins, of Saint Gabriel, of Abba Matta, of Saint Mercurius, of Immanuel, of St. George) have been carved out of red volcanic rock in the Middle-ages probably for the will of King Lalibela. The local sovereign wished to found a a “New Jerusalem” after Christian pilgrimage to the Holy Land was forced to stop due to Muslim conquest.

The twelve churches represent an exquisite example of a long-established Ethiopian building tradition and have been hewn out of monolithic rock: much is yet to discover about how the incredible work was executed, how many men it needed and which tools were employed, but it is common opinion, for churches like the Bet Giorgis (St George), that the workers would have started at the top and carved downwards creating the roof and the exterior walls of the church.Then they would have hollowed it out to give shape to the interiors and finally they would have further sculpted the rock to create doors, windows, columns and enriched the interiors with different details. The majestic work of carving was then completed by the construction of an extensive complex of drainage ditches, catacombs, caves and trenches in order to connect all the churches together in a maze-like underground system.

(via kureator)

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 1,086 notes.
Prosecutors Are Failing the Victims of Florida’s Notorious Reform School : The New Yorker

55 dead bodies and no investigation? More than sad.

Prosecutors Are Failing the Victims of Florida’s Notorious Reform School : The New Yorker

55 dead bodies and no investigation? More than sad.

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 0 notes. .

beingblog:

“You quickly learn that distractions are not just phone calls and emails. Our own mind and our longings, our cravings and our fantasies are also major distractions.”

Pema Chödrön is one of a few people that I’ve been pitching to be on the show for years. In this Bill Moyers’ interview from 2006, she makes a strong case for quieting our racing minds — and the value of powering down our electronic devices.

And, of course, she recommends meditation as a way of quieting and reopening the mind. The way she describes the process, though, makes one feel as if it’s a severe drug addiction. One I identify with all too well.

Please make this happen!

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 122 notes.
sorayachemaly:

From the Huffington Post. 

sorayachemaly:

From the Huffington Post. 

(via becauseiamawoman)

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 426 notes. .
theonion:

Woman Takes Short Half-Hour Break From Being Feminist To Enjoy TV Show

theonion:

Woman Takes Short Half-Hour Break From Being Feminist To Enjoy TV Show

(via becauseiamawoman)

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 30,959 notes. .
nybg:

sciencesoup:


Badass Scientist of the Week: George Washington Carver
George Washington Carver (1864–1943) was a botanist, an agricultural researcher and an educator. He was born on a small farm near Diamond Grove, Missouri, where his mother and brother were the only slaves of Moses and Susan Carver. When he was a baby, his mother was taken by Confederate night-raiders, and the Carvers raised the two boys as their own. George became interested in nature at a young age but schools were racially segregated—to get an education he was forced to leave home at twelve and work to support himself while studying. Racial barriers made applying to college a struggle too, but after four years he finally became the first black student at Simpson College, Iowa. Carver soon transferred to Iowa State College to study science, and he gained a Master’s in agriculture and bacterial botany in 1896. He was renowned within the school for his academic talent and his gift as a teacher. He then took up a position as head of agriculture at the all-black-staffed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. At the time, southern farming was devastated by years of civil war and the “loss” of slave labour, which was hurting the economy. Carver helped farmers recover: he recognised that years of growing cotton and tobacco had severely depleted the soil and so introduced “rotational” crops—alternating soil-depleting crops with soil-enriching crops like peanuts and sweet potatoes. To encourage farmers, he proceeded to invent hundreds of profitable applications of the crops, including adhesives, axel grease, biofuel, bleach, ink, metal polish, shaving cream, synthetic rubber and wood stain. Soon, his ingenuity led to speaking engagements, and by the 1920s he was on lecture tours of white colleges, opening students’ eyes to racial injustices and serving as a mentor to black students. He became a national folk hero, and after his death in 1943, President Roosevelt honoured Carver with a national monument. Carver never patented or profited from most of his profits—as his epitaph reads: “He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.”

The Garden is home to Carver’s mycological collections. His interest in mushrooms and fungi is less well known than his other achievements, but turns out to have been important as well. He was not a trained mycologist, but had an uncanny knack for finding rare and new species, including two named for him by NYBG scientist Job Bicknell Ellis.

nybg:

sciencesoup:

Badass Scientist of the Week: George Washington Carver

George Washington Carver (1864–1943) was a botanist, an agricultural researcher and an educator. He was born on a small farm near Diamond Grove, Missouri, where his mother and brother were the only slaves of Moses and Susan Carver. When he was a baby, his mother was taken by Confederate night-raiders, and the Carvers raised the two boys as their own. George became interested in nature at a young age but schools were racially segregated—to get an education he was forced to leave home at twelve and work to support himself while studying. Racial barriers made applying to college a struggle too, but after four years he finally became the first black student at Simpson College, Iowa. Carver soon transferred to Iowa State College to study science, and he gained a Master’s in agriculture and bacterial botany in 1896. He was renowned within the school for his academic talent and his gift as a teacher. He then took up a position as head of agriculture at the all-black-staffed Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. At the time, southern farming was devastated by years of civil war and the “loss” of slave labour, which was hurting the economy. Carver helped farmers recover: he recognised that years of growing cotton and tobacco had severely depleted the soil and so introduced “rotational” crops—alternating soil-depleting crops with soil-enriching crops like peanuts and sweet potatoes. To encourage farmers, he proceeded to invent hundreds of profitable applications of the crops, including adhesives, axel grease, biofuel, bleach, ink, metal polish, shaving cream, synthetic rubber and wood stain. Soon, his ingenuity led to speaking engagements, and by the 1920s he was on lecture tours of white colleges, opening students’ eyes to racial injustices and serving as a mentor to black students. He became a national folk hero, and after his death in 1943, President Roosevelt honoured Carver with a national monument. Carver never patented or profited from most of his profits—as his epitaph reads: “He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.”

The Garden is home to Carver’s mycological collections. His interest in mushrooms and fungi is less well known than his other achievements, but turns out to have been important as well. He was not a trained mycologist, but had an uncanny knack for finding rare and new species, including two named for him by NYBG scientist Job Bicknell Ellis.

This was posted 3 months ago. It has 2,313 notes. .